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Flour on the Floor: Banana Bread

There is a wide gap between a Jiffy mix with its banana flakes and honest-to-goodness, gooey, moist, black stringed banana bread and I am eager to convert the kids.

In our home, there is a birthday almost every week.  Most of these important days belong to dolls or stuffed animals.  My daughter or son will announce first thing in the morning: “It's Bunny’s birthday!”  This is code for: We want muffins.  I keep those tiny boxes of Jiffy mixes on hand for just this sort of occasion.  They are fast to mix and bake, make only 6 muffins, and are cheap.  In other words, the perfect before-school fake-birthday treat.

My husband picked up some of the Jiffy boxes at the store for us in February but instead of blueberry muffin mix, he bought (gasp!) banana.  The kids were appalled.  There have been no birthdays in months; the stuffed animals have simply stopped aging.

Now, I am all set to start this baking project and what is the very first recipe in the first chapter (“Quick breads, Muffins, Biscuits and Scones”) of the Baking Illustrated book?  You guessed it—banana bread.  But there is a wide gap between Jiffy with its banana flakes and honest-to-goodness, gooey, moist, black-stringed banana bread and I am eager to convert the kids.   

Though I have billed this as a “mother-daughter” project, my son asks if he can bake with us this week.  I am thrilled that he wants to get involved.  He asks, just to be sure, “Will you mention me in your blog?”  And his true intent is revealed—publicity!  Then the phone rings and he is invited to a play-date and is out the door before the ingredients are even out of the cabinets. 

Luckily, though, we do have a special guest on hand that makes this first time a “mother-daughter/mother-daughter” entry.  My tall, blonde, Southern-accented mom is visiting from North Carolina.  She is more accustomed to making things that can be smothered in gravy than those slathered in frosting.  Baking is not her forte but once you’ve had her cast-iron pan-fried cornbread, you’ll wonder why you ever bothered to use an oven in the first place. 

The three of us (or at least the two who can read) choose one of the proposed variations of the bread: Banana-Coconut Bread with Macadamia Nuts.  After a week of shooing the kids away from the ripening bananas, we finally get to put them to use.  The cookbook suggests using yogurt as the included dairy (instead of milk, buttermilk, or sour cream—the editors have tried them all) and I have bought Greek yogurt without considering how it will fare in the recipe.  Oh well, fingers crossed. 

While I assemble the ingredients, my daughter helps by fashioning a face out of bananas and nuts.  Mom starts as she always does when she is in my kitchen—she sharpens the knives.  When she arrives our knives are usually too dull to pierce tomato skin; when she leaves we’re all wearing Band-Aids.

While my daughter and I measure the dry ingredients, my mom casts herself as chopper, dishwasher, and photographer.  I wonder sadly what I will do without all of her “ers” when she leaves next week.  I am kept busy teaching a four-year-old how to measure over the sink instead of the bowl in case of spills.  And how to level off a measuring cup.  And not to lick her fingers and dunk them in the sugar.  Even with Mom here, I need about three more hands.   

We toast the coconut and macadamia nuts in the oven and our home begins to smell like the tropics, or at least “tropical” suntan oil.  It’s wonderful.  Once the stirring begins, I quickly realize that I am the sous chef.  Garfunkel to my daughter’s Simon.  I am Ringo.  Harpo.  Squiggy.  She won’t relinquish the spoon; I get to hold the bowl still.  She adds the ingredients; I put the measuring spoons and cups in the sink where my mom washes them.  There is a hierarchy here and it is not as I had planned.  I am thrilled to see her interest and confidence but also am feeling a little left out of the process.

The Baking Illustrated editors suggest the “quick bread” method for mixing which means dry ingredients in one bowl, wet in another, then gentle mixing of the two.  They warn that too much mixing means too much gluten which means a dense, low loaf.  I ask for the spoon as my daughter over-stirs.  “One minute,” she says as she mixes and mixes.  We might break a tooth on this bread but she’ll be happy.

I wonder if her interest will remain this strong as this project continues.  I see opportunities for teaching non-baking things like listening and taking turns.  But today, we relax and just get the bread into the oven.

The loaf turns darker faster than I expect and I end up having to lower the oven temperature midway to get the center of the bread cooked.  But when the timer sounds, the bread has done a fine job rising.  We let it cool for the minimum five minutes before digging in (though snack time officially ended an hour ago at 5:30pm). 

My husband says it tastes amazing, but then he likes anything that's topped with butter.  Mom asks for the recipe to take home.  My son, home from his play-date, proclaims, “I don’t like it,” before smiling and adding, “I love it!”  And, last, my daughter has a bite and says simply, “Yuck.”

Tomorrow, though, she will eat my entire breakfast of buttered banana bread and deny ever not-liking it.  Her memory is malleable but I hope we are making some good ones here in the kitchen.

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Sara Fay May 18, 2011 at 03:09 PM
Reading Pamela's post about banana bread made me crave it (surprise, surprise -- it may not be her kids' favorite, but I love banana bread!), so I made my own. Here's my recipe, adapted from my mom's -- which means I added chocolate and coconut: 1 cup mashed overripe bananas, 1 egg, 1/3 cup milk, 1/2 cup vegetable oil (a little less), 2 cups flour, 1/3 cup sugar (I use maple syrup instead), 3 tsp baking powder, 1 tsp salt, 1/2 cup chocolate chips, and sometimes I add coconut too. Preheat oven to 375. Beat egg, mix in wet ingredients. Add dry ingredients. Bake 20 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean.
Wes Lee May 18, 2011 at 04:11 PM
Love this one. I put bananas in everything--including a few slices to keep meat loaf moist. Don't laugh. If you had something like that at a place like Alinea, you'd say the chef was a genius. Can't wait for your next adventure.
Jane Wheel May 18, 2011 at 04:22 PM
The banana bread sounds delicious--but the scene and the mother-daughter-mother-daughter event sound even more delicious. Can't wait for the next recipe. I'll bet the stuffed animal birthdays return!
jamie stein May 18, 2011 at 05:44 PM
What a great idea! looking forward to following - out of aspiration and curiosity. i will also make myself available as a taster. :)
Erica May 18, 2011 at 05:56 PM
It's great how you paint the picture of what's going on (combined with the pictures) I actually feel as if I am right there with you. Great job!
Gail Rothbard May 18, 2011 at 06:59 PM
This is so exciting. I love how everyone is participating...especially the one's that are doing the sampling!!! Can't wait until next Wednesday. So nice. Gail
Andrea May 18, 2011 at 07:04 PM
I loved reading this, Pamela! I have a fantastic banana bread recipe (with choc chips) that will surely convert the most adamant non-banana-bread eater - but the chocolate is probably the reason. I'll send the recipe. Also - we keep a ziplock bag in the freezer with peeled, super ripe bananas. They're always on hand for a quick banana bread or to use in a smoothie (and then you don't need to add ice!) We go through bunches of bananas every week, so sometimes I intentionally buy the almost overripe ones just to make sure the freezer stock doesn't get depleted!
Peggy Wolff May 18, 2011 at 07:59 PM
Love your food writing, Pamela. Oh, the stories we can tell around food..... Peggy Wolff
Beverly Walther May 18, 2011 at 08:55 PM
What a great idea! Maybe reading about your adventures will inspire me to have some of my own.
allison latimer May 18, 2011 at 09:54 PM
fantastic!!! i am already a follower!
lisa May 19, 2011 at 01:57 AM
Great story! It's wonderful -- and as a big chocolate chip banana bread maker, we can do a Washington Ave. loaf trade....
Angie May 19, 2011 at 02:01 AM
Such a great idea Pamela! Reading it, I felt likeI was right there with you guys.... just tell me when and I will bring my empty plate. And, maybe a stuffed animal or two that have birthdays coming up!
Malinda May 19, 2011 at 04:59 AM
Love banana bread! Reminds me of my honeymoon when we were in Maui and taking a day trip to Hana. Everyone we had spoken to the days prior had told us that we SHOULD NOT miss the banana bread stand - that it was the best banana bread, anywhere! Of course, being the night owls that we are, Carter & I woke up late and by the time we reached the banana bread stand, it was all sold out. Typical! Guess I'll have to try your recipe, Pamela! Love the blog...can't wait to see what is baking next week.
Shelly May 19, 2011 at 05:05 PM
Hi Pamela, Love the blog.. will be tuned in for next weeks episode.. Love To All The (Bakers) Aunt Shelly
Ben Morris May 25, 2011 at 03:40 PM
I love banana bread but what I'd really love to see is more of "my tall, blonde, Southern-accented mom " who looks like a real fox. Can you involve her more in your "mixer madness?" I am sure she can do something with chocolate.

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